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Full text of "The Pine Burr"

'Press of 

The Observer 'Printing House, Inc. 

Charlotte, 5V. C. 






<The 1924 

PINE BURR 









^Pu blished S4 nnua lly 



by the 

SENIOR CLASS 

of 

LINCOLNTON HIGH SCHOOL 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 










i^S 




S4s we near the close of the book of 
our lives, and thoughts of the future have 
lost their fascination, the time will come 
when many of our pleasures are derived 
from memories of the fcast. So, if, when 
the days have lengthened into go/den years, 
this book will helfi you to recall memories 
of the ftast, we shall feel that our efforts 
have not been in vain. vv ith all good 
wishes the staff presents this volume of the 

PINE BURR 



























BOOK I. CLASSES 



BOOK II. CLUBS 
BOOL III. ATHLETICS 
















M. II. Ilovi,]', 
T. F. Love 



THE SCHOOL r.OARD 

Dr. I. R. Si-:r,i' 
Chairman 



M. II. MaunEy 
Harry Page 















DEDICATION 



We dedicate this volume of the 

PINE BURR 

to the members or the School Board 

of Lincolnton, who have in a large 

measure made possible our school, 

and all it means to us. 



Page Seven 

























Page Eight 



Pine Burr Staff 












• 















Pine Burr Staff 

Helen Rein ii vrdt Editor-in-( hief 

James Smith hsistcmt Editoi 

Rob Goodk ) 

> Business Managers 

Jessie Gamble ) 

Philip Coon Idvcrtisincj Editor 

Di m ples 1 'arker / 

[.. ( iubs 

M \RVI \ RoYSTER } 

Bryth Royster - Literary Editor 

Mae W i i.i.i a ms /r;Av\ 

Russell I [uggins Ithlelics 

( )i.i.n: \\ \r. Crowell ...Poctrx 

I [owell Gabriel / . 

J- -. Junior Kepresentatives 

Laura MacDonald ) 

Addik Mak SeaglE - Statistics 

Elizabeth McLean Freshman Representative 

ViviLEK LinEberger Sophomore Representative 
























Page Nine 












To the Glass of 1924 



At the request of the- editors 1 am offering a statement for the PiNU Burr. 
It is a request for you to help make the aim of the I.incolnton High School more 
practical and the methods more business-like. 

Let the aim be to develop the greatest possible number of bovs and girls 
into the highest type of useful citizens. A good citizen is morally straight and 
physically fit, is a lover of good art, good music, and good literature, and is a 
community booster. Well-trained citizens know bow to make their pastime 
profitable as well as pleasant. But of supreme importance is the training for 
the vocation one is to follow. 

Schools must begin to train toward the homes instead of away from them ; 
girls must be taught to cook, to sew, and how to make good homes. For the 
boys and for the girls not domestically inclined the training should look toward 
the offices, fields, and shops. They must be trained for some useful occupation 
rather than prepared for only the white-collar positions. The aim for cultural 
training is good but the practical must be emphasized more than it is at present. 
The idea is to make the school of theory more like a miniature world for practice. 

The very small per cent, of pupils finishing the free high schools is a clear 
indication that the aim sought and the methods used are wrong. An aim toward 
the practical will attract more pupils while improved methods will make the 
training more accessable. A better method would offer the high school to adults 
in the evenings for household economics, commercial subjects, physical training, 
and amusements. Illiterates could also be taught in evening classes. For those 
who must help support the home, classes that work two weeks and go to school 
two weeks could be arranged. Methods must be adopted that put the school in 
reach of the entire community. Furthermore the method should be to train and 
not to grade boys and girls, to build health instead of tear it down. On many 
girls and boys the strain is so terrible that for mental and physical reasons some 
are asked to stand aside as poor candidates, ever to be" labeled "finished product." 

The aims and methods must be improved. Who can help do it? Who will 
help do it? Is it not a chance for you to help the schools in one of their real 
problems ? 

Cordially yours. 

E. D. Johnson. 











































Mr. 1 1. !•'. Krai ss, Principal 



Faculty 









Miss Joh n Anthony 
English 

Miss Eunice MacKay 
French and History 

Miss Lillian Morris 
Latin 

Mr. I [. I\ Krauss 

Mathematics 



M iss Ai.ktiii \ BailLy 
( ' ommercial 

M tss IsAni'.i. Spears 
Sewing and French 

Miss Clara Sullivan 
Chemistry 

.Miss .Mabel Bacon 
History and Mathematics 






M iss M ary I'Yi/rox 
Music 



Page Eleven 



















.Mrs. Jas. A. Abkrxkthy, Sponsor 



Page Twelve 





















/. Classes 













MASCOT 
Master "I'.ii.i," Johnston 

* 

Seniors 

Motto: "Love, Honor, Loyalty" Flower: Carnation 

Colors: Pink ami Green 

Russell Huggins President 

Jessie Gamble Vice-President 

Bryte Royster ...Secretary 

Rob C. Goode *- ...Treasurer 

Page Fourteen 



































JOHN T AKERS 
"My mind to me a kingdom is." 



OLLIE MAE CROWELL 

'Smile and the world smiles zvith you, 
ll'eep and yon weep alone." 



John is an exceptionally good stu- 
dent. He takes great interest in the 
practical things of life. I lis mind is 
always keen and on the alert. His 
common sense, combined with a keen 
sense of intellectual preception, makes 
him a real asset to the class of '24. 
and it is with best wishes that we 
wish him the greatest success in any- 
thing that he might attempt to do. 



This is especially true of ( >llie 
Mae, for she is one of the best- 
natured girls in the class of '24. 

She has been with the class fur all 
our high school days, and has proven 
to lie loyal to school, class, and fac- 
ulty. 

Ollie Mae is jolly, sociable, optim- 
istic ; and rarely if ever, do you see 
her blue. In her you find a true 
friend — one who can always be de- 
pended upon. 









Page Fifteen 












PHILIP COON 
"Phil" 

"III- taketh much delight in music 
inxl in mcilt , and poetry.' 




PAULINE FINGER 

''Her air, her manners, all who saw 
admired; courteous, though coy, and 
aciitlc though retired." 



"Phil," although he takes a great 
delight in athletics, is far mure in- 
terested in music. 

lie is a good friend to have around 
for he is always smiling, full of pep, 
and ready to do his part when a call 
for help is' issued. 

We all feel sure that a great future 
awaits Philip, 



We will always remember Pauline 
as a worthy, honored, admired 
schoolmate. She has shared with 
vis the happiness as well as the strug- 
gles of our school life. 

Pauline is good-natured, indus- 
trious, energetic, and broad-minded, 
and we feel sure that with these 
characteristics success awaits her. 






Page Sixteen 





















• 











JESSIE GAMBLE 
"Jess" 

"She delights to serve those around 
her and to make them happy and 
content." 






ROB C. GOOUE, JR. 

"Snub" 

"/.' it and wisdom are horn with a 
man." 






. 












Better known as "Jess" to her 
many friends, Jessie is without a 
doubt the best-liked girl in school, 
for was she not voted the most pop- 
ular member in the class of '24? 
Her winning smile and sunny dis- 
position have won for her a place 
in the hearts of all her classmates, 
and it is with the deepest sincerity 
that we wish her the greatest of suc- 
cess in her career as a surgeon. 



Rob, better known as "Snub," is 
one of the biggest talkers in our 
class. Although small in stature, he 
is full of life. His greatest weakness 
is playing jokes on his friends, and- 
almost every one has been a victim 
of his numerous pranks. "Snub" is 
also one of the most dependable 
members in our class, and can al- 
ways be counted upon to do his part 
in everything. 

We have always heard that no one 
could be both "witty and wise," but 
as there is always an exception to 
every rule, "Snub" is the exception 
to this one. 









Page Seventeen 














CARRIE HALLMAN 

"There is nothing so womanly as 
virtue." 



Carrie, although small in stature, 
is full of life. She is youthful and 
attractive in appearance, sunny and 
unassuming in disposition. Her 
originality, wit. and natural ability, 
are the qualities that place her first 
in the hearts of her classmates. 

Carrie anticipates teaching, a work 
for which she is well qualified. We 
wish and predict for her a success- 
ful career. 






ADDIE HAUSE 

"Work is the law of life." 

* 

Addie is strong in character, mod- 
est in behavior, faithful to her 
friends, and always willing to stand 
by her class in anything it under- 
takes. She has been with us only 
a year but her work has been very 
commendable. She always looks on 
the bright side of life, and is very 
congenial. 









\ 



Page Eighteen 

























PAULINE HONEYCUTT 
"Roscoe" 

'Not too serious, not too gay.' 



Pauline is a very modest young 

lady, and docs the things that are 
right regardless of the cost. She 
does not have a very strong apitnde 
for foreign languages, yet she is 
successful. 

Her loyalty to the class of '24 
will always be remembered by us, 
and we wish her the best of success 
in life's journey. 










RUSSELL HUGGINS 
"Pussel" 

"Of sturdy worth his deeds best 
show." 



"Pussel" has the personality that 
wins the good will of every one. As 
president of the class he lias helped 
to make it what it is by his support 
and loyalty toward his fellow-stu- 
dents. 

On account of his broad mind we 
feel that whatever path of life he 
takes it will lead to success. 





















Page Nineteen 












' 













KATHERINE HARRILL 
"Kat" 

'. / lovelier nymph the pen never 



dr, 



"Kat" will always lie remembered 
by her classmates, on account of her 
honor and loyalty. 

At first glance you wouldn't think 
she is musical, but she is very fond 
of hymns (hims). Even though ''Kat" 
is the long (long in stature and long- 
winded) member of our class she is 
aii all-round good pal. 

"Kat," we predict yours to be a 
brilliant future. 







ARTHUR PARKER 
"Mary" 

'lie has a zvay with the 'zvimmin. 



And who will doubt it for was he 
not voted the most attractive mem 
her of our class? 

He certainly is the "he"-vamp of 
'2.4, with the teachers as well as the 
pupils. 

He did not take to his studies ex- 
actly as a duck to water, but instead 
starred in other things — athletics. 
Although he has been with us for 
only a year he has made a name for 
himself in that line. 

Always courteous, and thoughtful, 
we predict for his future, nothing 
but the very best that life holds. 












Page Twenty 


















• 














DIMPLES PARKER 
"Dimps" 

"Smile alzvays." 

* 



MARVIN ROYSTER 

"Venus" 

"Don't do today what you can do 
tomorrow." 









This is certainly Dimples' motto 
for one seldom sees her without ;i 
hroad smile. 

What is she like? Just a wee bit 
of a girl. [Jut then it is said that 
precious articles come in small pack- 
ages, and Dimples is certainly a good 
example of this. 

We regret that she lias been with 
us for only a year, for so jovial is 
her manner, so full of pep her body, 
and so attractive her "Land-Lapper" 
brogue that we would like to have 
had her with us for all four years. 



"Venus" was voted the laziest boy 
in our class. In spite of his laziness 
he is a very good athlete and has 
helped L. II. S. to win many vic- 
tories. 

lie always has his lessons pre- 
pared therefore he must study some, 
even though no one ever caught him 
in the act. 

Marvin is one of the quietest boys 
in our class — sometimes. 

We wish him much success in all 
that he undertakes. 










Page Twenty-one 





























RUTH RHODES 
'Work is the Laiv of Life." 



Ruth entered our class the first of 
this year from Daniels School. 

She has very enviable traits, the 
most important of which is that of 
making friends. She is quiet, but is 
a very good student. 

Whatever course she pursues in 
life, we know she will make a suc- 
cess of it. 






BRYTE ROYSTER 

'Of all your knowledge this vain 

fruit you have; 
To walk :uith eyes broad open to 
the grave." 



"Bryte" does indeed suit her for 
she is the brightest member in our 
class. Being the youngest does not 
cause her to be young in mind for 
she thinks far beyond her age. 

She is quick-witted, humorous, 
sound in character, always cheerful, 
and meets her friends with a search- 
ing look and a friendly smile. 















Page Twenty-two 


































*A 












HELEN REINHARDT 
"Cowboy" 

"Happy am /, from care I'm free. 
Why aren't they all contented like 
me.'" 



Is there anything that Helen can't 
do well? She is a splendid student: 
star athlete, and is an all-round girl. 
She has spent many hours in help 
ing to make this the best annual vet. 

She deserves the best thai life 
holds, and we truly hope she may 
get it. Good luck, Helen. 






JAMES SMITH 

"What care I when / can lie in rest. 
Kill lime and take life at its very 
best." 



"Ruck" has never in our recollec- 
tions been in a hurry. Still he works, 
he is bound to, for how could he 
prove a geometry proposition as he 
dees without studying. 

ile has the appearance of a man 
of leisure, but we believe he will 
make good just the same. His 
record on the football field justifies 
this statement. His stature together 
with his strength, won for him the 
position of fullback on our football 
squad this year. 






Page Twenty. three 









MICC 























ADDIE MAE SEAGLE 
"Pat" 

'Trouble never troubles me.' 



"Pat" is the smallest member in 
our class, but she is full of energy, 
and is always planning" some mis- 
chief. She was voted the cutest girl 
in the Senior class, and it is thought 
that she voted for herself for the 
vote was unanimous. 

Addie Mae's outstanding character- 
istic is her loyalty to her friends. 
Once a friend of hers you are al- 
ways one and anything that is to be 
done, she is always ready to do her 
part. 






MYRTLE SELF 

"Mutt" 

"Many daughters have done virtu- 
ously, but thou excellest them all." 



* 



"Mutt" looks very dignified but 
don't let her fool you. You have 
heard that proverb about "still wa- 
ters?" 

Of course every one loves Myrtle. 
Who could help loving a girl with 
such a pleasing personality and such 
gentle manners? For a practical, 
well-rounded girl we turn to Myrtle. 















Page Twenty-four 






• 



. 

























BENJAMIN SUMNER 
"Pitxkr" 
















~ ■ 



BESSIE STAMEV 
"Bess" 
























"Fun without a friendship is no 
friendship at all." 



"Pitner" is superior to the whole 
class in length, lie is one of those 
fortunate individuals who always 
looks mi the bright side of life, and 
there is a circle of wit wherever he 
is found. He never worries over his 
hooks but he never fails to pass. 

Ben's stacomb hill is larger than 
anyone's in the class, so you see 
that neatness is one (if his charac- 
teristics also. 



'Be kind to those around you." 



Bessie is the 
in the class 
round girl, 
teachers. 

"Hess" is 
ways corner 
work done. 



most congenial girl 
if '24. She is an all- 
ival td her class, and 



very studious and al 
to school with all her 
Her hobby is working 
geometry propositions, so we know 
that whatever she attempts in future 
life, siie will make a success of it. 









- 









Page Twenty. five 














LOUISE WETMORE 
"Squeeze" 

'What fairy-like music stalls over 

the sea, 
Entracing our senses with charmed 

melody." 



Although, somewhat of a dreamer 
Louise can always afford to wake 
up long enough to take part in any 
mischief at hand. She is of a whole- 
some, fun-loving, disposition, and a 
jollier friend you'll find nowhere. 

Louise takes things as they come, 
and is well content except in her 
music, in which she is forever seek- 
ing higher goals, and in which we 
all foresee a brilliant future. 



ZELDA WINGATE 

"The maid proves her charms with 
inward greatness, unaffected wis- 
dom, and modesty of manner." 



Zelda has been with us only a year 
but in this time she has proved to 
both teachers and pupils that she is 
ca]ial)le of performing any task she 
undertakes. 

Her hobbies are reading Virgil and 
debating. Zelda has won for her- 
self many friends, not only in the 
eleventh grade, but in the whole 
school as well. 



Page Twenty. six 


































MAE WILLIAMS 

"She has the beauty of the night, 

( hid in a iiiilliuii stars." 



Mae is one of our most popular 
and studious girls. Although she 
puts much time on her studies she 
has not been ahle to decide whether 
her heart l!es with her school or her 
next door neighbor. 

Many times we have seen Mac 
burning midnight oil on her school 
duties and annual, so here is to the 
girl who is studious and a good 
sport. Good luck! 




FRED YODER 



'Trifles themselves are elegant in 



hi in 



It was only last fall that Fred 
entered our class, but since then we 
have found that he has many amiable 
characteristics. 

lie is never in a hurry, hut he 
always comes out in the lead. Ills 
pleasant smile and winning ways 
have won for him a permanent place 
in the hearts of all his classmates. 

Whether it is true or not we do 
not know, lint it is rumored that 
Fred is very bashful, especially with 
the members of the fairer sex. 


















Page Twenty-seven 






• 







BLANCHE YODER 



'Zealous yet modest." 



Blanche has been with us for only 
one year, but since that time she has 
proven herself to be both capable 
and commendable in her work. 

She studies hard, and thus passes 
in all her work. If Blanche should 
choose the profession of teaching, 
we feel that she would become an 
adept in it. 



Page Twenty-eight 















* 



Senior Glass History 



ney is almost at an end, we depart, promising our unending loyalty and love to her in 
the years to come. May every 
of the days gone by, as we do 






In all its historv the Lineolnton High School had never admitted such an array of 
freshmen as crowded t<> her doors in the fall of nineteen hundred] and twenty. Forty-five 
bovs and girls were entered to begin their long and weary climb for that magic day called 
graduation, when all their trials and pleasures in high school would he over. We had 
come through our grammar grades with living colors (mostly green) and had now entered 

!high schi ml with that same adjective applied to us. 
We found, within a few days of our entrance, that our old friends (?), English and 
.Math, were still with us, and also made new acquaintances in the form oi Latin and 
Science. In spite of the fact that we had to work hard, we managed to have a very de- 
lightful time, and when vacation came, we could not analyze our feelings to the extent of 
whether we were glad or sorry. 

The next year, our sophomore, we were amply repaid for all the hardships we had 
suffered the year before — for were not we now in a position to exert our authority over 
the freshmen? 

As was to he expected, our studies this term were harder, but that new feeling oi 
dignity and the hearty cooperation and friendship of our sister class, the seniors, helped 
us through. And so another year Hew by, increasing our love for the Lineolnton High 
School. 

With the taking up ol our Junior studies, we also took up our rivalry with the Senior 
class. 

This was regarded by all of us as our most enjoyable year in high school. Oh, the 
good times we did have! Xot to mention the Junior-Senior banquet. In those few short 
hours we forgot all the weeks of suspense and hard work that we had experienced. Ami 
will wonders newer cease! We buried the hatchet and forgot to he rivals. 

At the end of this term there were no doubts in our hearts — we were genuinely sorry 
to see the year draw to a close. 

When we were organized in nineteen twenty-three, we realized with a thrill of pride 
that our ranks numbered thirty-four, the largest senior class ewer enrolled in the Lincoln- 
ton 1 liglt School. 

As a class we have had our joys and sorrows, our struggles and triumphs. One of 
these words is to be applied to the holiday we received when unsuspected genius suddenly 
showed itself among us in the form of unknown artists who decorated our building in a 
most alarming and conspicuous manner. 

Of course, we felt in duty bound to secure and use all the senior privileges that we 
had been hearing and dreaming about for three long years. Try our surprise and chagrin 
(he faculty, and others concerned,, did not always agree with our wise judgments, and we 
were often forced to yield a point — it is hoped as gracefully as was becoming to our 












dignity. 

\ow as the time draws near for us to leave old high school forever, when our jour- 



the vears to come. May every class leaving her doors, carrv away as many happy memories 



Kai'ii i'.ui nk !•'.. I I ARRl 1,1.. 



Page Twenty. nine 

































Glass Poem 




With aching hearts, our classmates dear 

We bid yi >u all adieu ; 
The many friendships formed this year 

We'll cherish fond and true. 

S( life's stern call we all must heed 
Though hard ma) be our pari : 

:n make our lives one goodly deed 
< )i purity in heart. 

Farewell, dear teachers, now farewell, 
You're loving, tried, and true. 

A happy life we would foretell 
With love for eaeh of you. 

And to Miss Anthony, farewell, 
You've been our faithful friend; 

Old I [igh School, too, farewell, 
h'or you our prayers ascend. 

( )i,i.ii''. M ay Crow km,. 






Page Thirty 





















Statistics for the Glass of 1924 

Census taking is a very trying and also an illuminating process which amazes a number 
of people and the members of the eleventh grade we're prodigiously startled to find accom- 
plishments which were before unknown to them. 

No one will be surprised to hear that Jessie Gamble is the most popular one of our 
number. i 

Although John Akers is the most studious member of the class, he is also the typical 
Senior. i 

Who would have thought that Helen Reinhardt, the best arguer, is also the nerviest? 

Originality seems to reign in our room as Louise Wetmore and Aruthur Parker tied 
in this characteristic. 

Catherine 1 larrill is designated as being the must conceited, but may it be understood 
that she is alsn the most tactful. 

Beauty and charm seem to be distributed throughout all the class, as May Williams is 
the prettiest, Pauline Finger and Jessie Gamble share in being the most stylish, Fred 
Yoder is the handsomest, and Jessie Gamble, Arthur Parker, and the buffeted census 
taker are the most attractive. 

Ruth Rhodes is considered the most dignified, while the most indifferenl is Blanche 
Yoder. 

Every one will agree when we say that Zelda Wingate deserves to he called the most 
interesting. 

Honors seem to be evenly divided since Louise Wetmore and Philip Coon are the 
most talented; Russel Huggins and Dimples Parker are the most adaptable. 

Although none of us are very loud, Pauline Honeycutt was voted the loudest member 
of the class, while Ben Sumner was voted the densest. 

Dimples Parker is the best all 'round, and the humble statistician, the cutest. 

The most religious of the noble class of '24 is Myrtle Self, who is also the most inde- 
pendent. 

Who will disagree with the census that Ollie Mae Crow ell is the most loquacious? 

Our most capable girl is Bryte! Royster. and likewise, she is considered the brightest 

Talent is one of the outstanding' features, of our brilliant class, as Louise Wetmore is 
the most musical, and James Smith, the most athletic. 

By unanimous vote, Mary Schrum is the biggest flirt and the stoutest in our class. 

The unexpected will often happen, but the thing that seems most queer, is that Helen 
Reinhardt is the biggest bluff, and Rob Goode is the most annoying and the biggest snob. 

Statistics show that Philip Coon is the most courteous and also the most accomplished. 

We could not believe Mr. Johnson until a census was taken and that proved to us 
that Marvin Royster was the laziest. 

From reading the statistics, I know you will not think that the statistician is the most 
precise. , 

Pauline Finger is considered the best dressed, while Carrie Hallman is the best sport. 
and Addie Hause is the thinest and the most modest. 

Now that you! have heard of all of our affairs as a class. I believe that you will be 
interested in our more intimate personal likes and dislikes. 

Our favorite colors are pink and greet), while we think the most thrilling song is 
"I Love Me." 

According to Mr. Krauss our most characteristic expression is "I Meant To Do That." 

Of all the many beautiful flowers the girls have chosen "Sweet William," while the 
boys like "Lady's Slippers." 

Our highest ambition is to see the whole world and a part of the heavens blotted 
with a big '24. 

With this the records of the Class of 'Twenty- four ends. 

Wmk Mae SejaglE. 



Page Thirty-one 









Class Prophecy 












Oik- day in .May. 1944, while putting the last touches to a painting entitled "School 
Days," I glanced at the calendar hanging on the walls of my studio and saw that it was 
the nineteenth of May. The next day would he the twentieth — just exactly twenty years 
since the class of 1024 was graduated from the Lincolnton lligh School. My thoughts 
strayed hack to the old days, and I wondered how each of nty schoolmates had fared in 
his journey down the "River of Life." In my reveries I saw the class as we parted on 
the last night of commencement, each one to follow a separate walk in life. The picture 
changed, and another scene came into view — a reunion of the class of '24, after twenty 
years of struggling with the problems of life. Suddenly, 1 determined to make this dream 
a reality, if it were possible. At once I hunted ep) my old annual and got the class roll. 
After carefully going over the names, 1 found that I had kept in touch with only eight, 
hut since almost every home contains a radio outfit, I knew that through these eight 1 
could he in reach of the whole class within an hour; and those who lived at a very great 
distance could he here by tomorrow, because of the speedy service of the aerial routes. 
My work was to begin by calling on those who had remained in Lincolnton. 

The first on my list was one of the leading matrons of the town — the Mae Williams 
of our school days, who had married soon after her graduation, and was now leading a 
quiet and peaceful life with her husband, her bungalow, and her twelve children. She was 
delighted with my plan, and I left her home, hoping the others would be as well pleased. 

Coming up the street. 1 passed the drug store on the corner of Academy Street that 
had formerly been "I, awing & Costner," but now bore the name "Sumner, I, awing & 
Costlier." This change has taken place since Benjamin Simmer, a retired bachelor, 
gained controlling interest in the store. This bachelor is none other than the "Pitner" 
Simmers who used to report at the office for "climbing in and out the windows, and pick 
ing on the other students." 

When I passed the Capital Theatre, the posters caught my eye and I stopped to read 
the attractions for the next day. This is what I read: "Coming — May 20, 'The Queen of 
Movieland' — Addie Mae llauss in 'The Irony of Fate!'" 1 was surprised beyond words — 
but, we should be proud of Addie M;ae. for at least she has come into her own. 

From here 1 decided to go to the Lincolnton Opera House to see what was booked for 
the season. As I looked over the numbers, I noticed this company for May 20: "The 
1 larrill-l'arker Company," presenting Burlesque on "Romeo and Juliet." Well, to think 
thai Arthur Parker and "l\at" llarrill have realized their dreams of a stage career at last! 

Next I went to the Lincolnton Hospital to see Dr. I. E. Gamble. This steady and 
self-possessed medical doctor of the hospital used to be the blushing, quick-tempered 
lesseca Gamble of the past. The head nurse there is Bessie Stanley; the same Bess'e 
that used to he — as friendly and reliable as ever. 

I learned from Bessie that Myrtle Self had become a missionary and she had j n - 1 
returned from China. This altruistic work seems suitable for Myrtle as she always put 
the needy before herself. 

I met Pauline Finger on the street for the first time in twenty years. She told me 
she had been Mrs. Fanuim. and that she was just home from San Francisco. After I 
learned that she had once been married 1 remembered reading" of the famous' divorce case 
of the moving picture actor, Dustin Farnum. Pauline was the woman in the case and had 
sued him for divorce on the grounds of cruelty and non-support; and I knew at once that 
she resented the latter for she always would dress. 

1 learned from Pauline that Addie Mae Seagle was a stenographer for the U. Iluggum 
and 1 Kissum firm who were dealers in matrimony in San Francisco. She was greatly- 
satisfied except for the irregular office hours, which were from one until won. 

Very near Iron Station is a large plantation that is well known in this part of the 
country. It is owned by Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Royster who do farming, on a scientific 
basis. 1 knew Marvin was one of my classmates, but it was a great surprise when 1 
learned that his wife was formerly Ruth Rhodes, who, also was a member of the class 
of '24. 

\'ow that horseback-riding has become so popular among the younger set. an instructor, 
a Miss Crowell, has been engaged to give lessons. I I er name seemed familiar to me and 















' 






■ 



Page Thirty-two 



-— « . 



on inquiring I found this person to be the same Ollie Mae Crowell that was here. I went 
to eall on her and she told me that Mary Sehrum was now living in Crouse. the rival city 
of Lincolnton, and that she had become very wealthy from a patent medicine that she had 
prepared to rid people of surplus fat. This medicine is called "Schrum's Anti-Fat." 

Zelda Wingate is now one of the L. II. S. faculty. Her position is very trying, for 
in this progressive age she is required to put new life in the; dead Latin language, and to 
teach the pupils the modern method of riding safely through four years of a Latin course 
without falling" off their "ponies" and injuring their limlis. She told me that she looked 
forward to the following year, 1945, with great pleasure; for the faculty expected to 
move into the new school building by then. 

1 did not think Carrie Mailman would lead a political life, hut nevertheless, she was 
the first woman from North Carolina to lie elected to the Senate. She has endeared her- 
self to the men of this state by introducing and helping pass a law that "limited the 
woman's work to eight hours a day." This gives the men a few hours relief from the 
strenuous duties of housekeeping and rearing children. 

T was greatly surprised to find James Smith so near home; while in Charlotte last 
week, 1 went in one of the largest and most reliable banks of that city to cash a check. 
While at the teller's window 1 noticed a sheet of the bank stationery with "James W. 
Smith, President," at the heading". 1 was eager to know if this were one of my school- 
mates, so when I enquired about him I found this to be true. I also learned that James 
Smith, as president of this bank, was exerting the same force, energy, and determination 
that our "Buck" Smith exerted as fullback of the "L. FT. S." football team. 

I know that I have a great imagination, but when I learned that Helen Reinhardt. 
formerly "Cowboy" Reinhardt, owned a ranch out West and was breaking-in "bucking- 
bronchos"! I admit that wonders have not ceased and miracles do happen still. 

From the newspapers 1 found (hat Louise Wetmore was at the Florida beach on her 
vacation. Since Padrewski has retired, she has taken his place and has just finished a 
tour of Europe and the United States. T disliked to disturb her much-needed rest but 
I knew she would be glad to see her old classmates again. 

We used to hear that "God needed a song-bird in Heaven, so he took our Cams 















away." We of the present age know that this gap of twenty years lias been fil'ed by 
Philip Coon. The Philip who used to warble the songs of the L. H. S. Glee Club now 
trills his song-bird notes to the whole world. 

John Aikers has become a famous, and wide-known botanist. His fame rests in a 
discovery, namely, the beesquito, by grafting the front end of a bee on the back end of 
a mosquito he has revolutionized honeymaking. Because of the surplus number of mos- 
quitoes in Lincolnton this business is very profitable to the inhabitants. His book, "The 
Care and Protection of the Beesquito," is sold by Blanche Yoder, who by her conscientious 
efforts helps to advertise this industry throughout the country. 

Pauline Honeycutt is still in Lincolnton and is also the belle of this city. Although 
we thought flapperism had ceased to exist — not so with Pauline. She continues flapping. 
She orders her clothes from New York and through her I learned of Bryte Royster, who 
has become a model in a Fifth Avenue Modiste Shop, and since she has been so successful 
with this work, she is contemplating opening a shop in Lincolnton. 

Last week I read an article in the newspaper by which I learned that Rob Goode, the 
steeple-jack of the class of '24, has become a popular and successful man after twenty 
years of hard labor. He is known as "Bad Eye" Goode in New York, and has achieved 

nrrpat cnrresc at; a upffffinan atifl safe erart*'er I s:i\\ him i Ml llle street tmlav :inrl lie 1<Jil 















great success as a yeggman and safe cracker. I saw him on the street, today, and be told 
me he had beaten his way from New York to Lincolnton on the "P. I). <_).'" Aerial Route. 

There remained but two of the old classmates, Fred Yoder and the class president, 
Russell Muggins. I learned through Rob that Fred had become the heavyweight champion 
of the world by winning the belt from Dempsey. I lis manager! is Russell Muggins. Thus 
1 see that Russell has the same dignity and tendency to manage as he had when lie was 
president. of the Senior Class of '24. 

Thus T found that each one of these old friends had followed a different walk in life, 
and each had gained a distinguished place for himself, f learned also thai it is not always 
the few that are so brilliant in their classes during their younger days wdio are the most 
prominent in their later life. Several who were the most unsophisticated and the slowest 
to grasp ideas now hold some of the most important positions' of this -Uv. 

Dimi'i.ks Parker. 

Page Thirty-three 















Last Will and Testament 





















We, the Senior Class of 1924 of the Lincolnton High School, on this day, January 
the twenty-second, being in our right minds and thinking of fond memories of the past, 
do declare this to be our last will and testament. 

Article 1. To the Faculty and School Board, we, the class of 1924, do will cur appre 
ciations for comfort and protection while in their keeping. 

Art. 2. To the dear Juniors, we do will and bequeath all our paint cans and paint 
brushes, with the hope that they can secure a better paint than we did as ours lasted only 
a few weeks. 

Art. 3. To the boys of the Junior Class who have any desire to be human Hies, we 
give our place of practice, the school house tower, and recommend this wall as being the 
best place in the w r orld for beginners. 

Art. 4. I, 'Russell Muggins, bequeath my belief in the rotation of the sun around the 
earth, to David Lore, trusting that be will never be convinced otherwise. 

Art. 5. T, Rob Goode, do hereby will all accusations and good alibis to Frank Gamble 
with the hope that bis g 1 reputation will nut suffer so much as mine did. 

Art. 6. I do will to Sara Hall my religious ideals and aspirations to be a missionary 
in a foreign country. Signed Myrtle Self. 

Art. 7. T, Philip Coon, do hereby will and bequeath my musical talent to Aubrey 
Shives, hoping it will be a great help and a benefit to the Salvation Army of the world. 

Art. 8. f, Katherine 1 larrill, do hereby generously will and bequeath m\ musical feet 
tn my rival in the art of dancing to Mary Yoder with my full permission to annex all my 
former "Cake Eaters." 

Art. 9. T, May Williams, will my amazing ability to consume fabulous amounts of 
food to May Crouse Merritt with many good wishes that she may increase in weight as 
rapidly as I have. 

Art. HI. To .May Crouse Merritt and Clara Guignard, we. May Williams and Katherine 
1 larrill, do hereby will our incessant fusses and fights with hope that they can remain out 
of the hospital as long as we have. 

Art. 11. 1. Holi Goode, hereby will my can of black paint to Cadilac lleavncr with 
the desire that be may have better luck in the use of this paint than I did. 

Art. 12. I, Mary Sehrum, do will my ability to flirt to Virginia Perkins, hoping she 
will have the pleasure of vamping all the good-looking boys I missed, and my ardent de- 
sire for sporty clothes to Louise White as I am sure she could make use of such, during 
her frequent visits to Davidson. 

Art. 13. !. lien Sumner, do will my never-dying love for studying to Cadilac Heavner. 

Art. 14. 1. Arthur Parker, do by this will, bequeath to Aubrey Shives my position 
as right end on the football team. 

Art. 15. 1, I'.dith Yount, hereby will my quietness to Helen Setzer, and may she 
profit by it. 

page Thirty. four 
















































lArt. 16. I, Louise Wetmore, do bequeath my ability to swallow chewing gum in class 
to Ida Ford, hoping that after three years of indulgence in this habit she will hecome 
such an adept as I. 

Art. 17. We. Snub Goode and Cowboy Reiuhardt, do hereby will our interest in the 
Pine Burr to Aubrey Shives and Laura MacDonald, hoping they will he able to go to 
Charlotte as many times as we have. 

Art. 18. To Clara Guignard, I. Helen Reinhardt, do will and bequeath my name as 
"Cowboy" and my position as biggest bluff in the Senior Class, knowing she will do 
justice to both. 

Art. 19. T, Dimples Parker, hereby will and bequeath my book on. "How to Resign 
Oneself to the Fate of Being Little," to Willie Armstrong and 1 also will to her my front 
desk in the chemistry class. Because of her miniature size, this said desk offers her 
protection from the chalk, erasers, and other missiles which navigate the atmosphere during 
that class. 

Art. 20. To "Togo" Crowell, 1. Pauline 1 loneycutt, willingly give my place as Cham- 
pion Typist of the Lincolnton High School, as he by his long hours of practice and patient 
study deserves it. * 

Art. 21. I, Jessie Gamble, have a great desire to will my blushes to some member of 
the Junior Class, but as none seems so modest as I, it will lie necessary to keep them for 
my immediate use. 

Art. 22. T, Carrie Uallman, will my natural curly locks to Helen Rudisill and sin- 
cerely hope that the rain will not have such a disastrous effect upon them. 

Art. 23. I, Ruth Rhodes, do will my desire for good things to eat to Mary Pegram. 

Art. 24. The short and narrow path which connects the chemistry room to superin- 
tendent's office, I, James Smith, do will to John Senter. As I have trampled over this 
path many times during the past year I feel that it is my own private property. T also 
will to him the supreme honor of treading this path with Miss Clara Sullivan holding fast 
to his arm. 

Art. 25. I. Hen Sumner, do will all my paint brushes and love for painting to David 
Lore, hoiiing that he will not have as much trouble removing the paint from his hands 
as I did. 

Art. 2d. J'o Joe Terrell, I, Pauline I loneycutt, do with duv respect to her parents, 
generously will my bobbed hair. / 

Art. 27. I. Fred Voder, do will my profound knowledge of Purk's Conciliation With 
America, to Rhyne Little. 







yj -"X^^* m£ 







Page Thirty-five 





























































1 












Page Thirtv-si 












Junior Glass 

Aubrey S hives - ~ - — - President 

Kenneth IIkayxkr Treasurer 

Fran k Gamble - - - - - Secretary 



ROLL 

Mildred Anderson Mary Spencer Love 

Willie Armstrong Laura MacDonald 

Clyde Abernathey Margaret Lee 

Alline Broome May Crouse Merritt 

Beulah Blanton Virginia Perkins 

Ran- Costner James Putnam 

Olivia Chamberlain Mary Pegram 

George Crowell Helen Rudisill 

Ida Ford Nancy Robinson 

Howell Gabriel Richard Rees 

Clara Guignard Helen Setzer 

Frank Gamble Aubrey S hives 

Kenneth Heavner Virginia Sherrill 

[■Catherine Hoke Nelson Smith 

Sarah Hall Mary Lou Thompson 

David Lore Josephine Tekrili, 

Virginia Lore Lala Withers 

Rhyne Little Mart Voder 



Pagf Thirty-sfven 


















* 



History of Junior Glass 



Extracts From a junior's Diary 

September 8, 1921: Well! Our first day as Freshmen in Lincolnton High 
School is over. And such a day as it has been ! We enrolled forty-six, strong. 
this morning. Every one seems to think we are the most ignorant things that 
ever were seen. But what do we care? We know that we are just as fine a 
class as has ever been in school. 

January 2, 1922: My goodness! but it is hard to settle down to work after 
two weeks of happy Christinas holidays. Still, I suppose we'll get used to this 
drudgery against Latin, Science, English and Math some time. We are going 
to take up Algebra this semester, and they say its terrible! 

April 1, 1 ( '22: We took our much beloved sister class, the Juniors, on a 
breakfast this morning. And it wasn't an April Fool, either; it was real. 

September 7, 1922: Mercy! After four months of laziness and happiness, 
it seems almost impossible to try to study. But we are Sophomores now, and of 
course we think everything will go our way. There are only forty-two of us, 
for four of our number couldn't survive the shocks of the vacation. 






anuarv 1, 1 ( J23: Isn't this a nice way to start the New Near? Coming 
to school! We Sophs think its a crime, but we just can't make the school board 
listen to us. Still, we did have a wonderful holiday — two weeks of bliss — so I 
suppose we ought not to grumble so very much. 

April 27, 1923 : Right royally did we entertain the Seniors tonight. The 
whole company seemed to enjoy itself. Just think! Some day we will be 
Seniors, and the lower classes will be giving us parties ! 

September 6, 1923: Just three short months for a vacation. And now 
thirty-six Juniors have come back to carry on our good work. For the first 
time in our High School days our class is united. Heretofore, we have been 
divided into two rooms; but now, to our great delight, we are together. 

January 1, 1924: Mine gracious! Only ten short, happy days for Christ- 
mas! And now, to come back on Xew Year's day and have mid-term exams 
staring us in the face! The thought is almost unbearable, but, of course, all of 
this most illustrious class will pass, and we will finish our Junior year as suc- 
cessfully as we did our Freshman and Sophomore. What else could we do? 
Are we not the class of '25 ? 

Laura MacDonau), Historian. 

Page Thirty. eight 






■ 















A Touching Ballad 

It started in the Garden, where so many follies started; 
Eve threw her arms 'round Adam's neck one morning ere they parted 
She asked him for a five spot, and as a subtle stall 
She breathed against his ear-drum, "You're a good Kid, after all." 

She got the five. 

Then Cleopatra came along, you all know Cleopat, 
She had Mark Anthony's luggage in her Alexandria flat ! 
"It's just like this, dear." she explained. "I need a summer hat, 
Ten dollars will secure one; it's a lovely lid at that." 

She got the ten. 

Along came handsome Josephine, Kid Bonaparte's best bet, 
She kissed the Child of Destiny and asked him not to fret. 
"You may be slain at Waterloo," she murmured with a sob, 
"I wish you'd leave me fifty for a little diamond fob." 

She got the fifty. 

Xow, brothers, lift your glasses high, and drink this toast with me! 
Some make a hundred bones a week and some make twenty-three. 
Some make it in the summer, some make it in the fall. 
But this you can depend on, be she short, fair-sized or tall : 

She gets it all. 

■ — Anonymous. 



Page Thirty-nine 































'J. 















Page Forty 






Sophomore Glass 

Gladys Abernathey ~ President 

Kate Robi nson / ice-President 

Kenneth Goodson - Secretary mid Treasurer 












MEMBERS 












Blanche Blanton 
Ruth Davis 
Elva Deitz 
Ida Digh 
( )vella Duncan 
Mary Hines 
( )llie May Keever 
Viva LEE LtnEberger 
Sue Mauney 
Kathleen Mullen 
Ruth Parker 
Ralph Parker 
Charles Pegram 
Jack Ramsaur 
Kate Robinson 
Helen Rudisill 
Eelia Self 
Frances Sharp 
( )scar Shuford 
Helen Thompson 
Tsabelle Williams 
Sarah Voder 
James Pegram 
Austin Abernathey 



Gladys Abernathey 
Ralph Cochran 
estelle cornwell 
Kenneth Dellinger 
Robert Dellinger 
Rachel Edwards 
Ken xi'.tii Goodson 
Wilbur 1 1 allman 
Eugene Hartman 
Cecil Hauss 
\ aness i [oward 
Eindsey Hunter 
Annie Huss 
Lillian Kizer 
Carl Marlow 
I [arry Page 
Melza Roseman 

JOHN S ENTER 

Rudolph Shives 
Forest Smith 
David Warlick 
Louise White 
Clarence Wilkinson 



Page Forty one 






History of Sophomore Glass 

Looking backward, for the past years, over the history of the class of '26, 
I am reminded of those two seasons of the year called spring and summer. 

Our Freshman year was just like a Spring, 
We were truly green in everything. 
But then, in our minds a seed was planted, 
Which blossomed as the Spring's rays started. 

In the springtime of the class of '26, there were fifty of us as fresh begin- 
ners in the Lincolnton High School. ( )ur teachers were the Husbandmen who 
planted the seed and cultivated the soil of our fertile brains until the green 
shoots of knowledge began ro appear. 

Eugene Hartman was our president in those days. Under his efficient man- 
agement, and regardless of our motto: "Green but growing,"' our class traveled 
through the first year with unlimited prosperity. 

Now in my memory comes the joys and sorrows of the month of May. 
After the dreaded examinations had passed, we welcomed the coming summer 
vacation. 

At the close of the year, each of us left with the hope that the following 
year we might be joined together again, but as Sophomores in Lincolnton High 
School, and now : 

"After the springtime, tender, and green, 
We welcome the radiance of summer's sheen ; 
With its glorious sunshine and silvery shores — 
Thus we have turned into SOPHOMORES." 

G. A. 





































Page Forty. two 














































Page Forty-three 















Freshman Glass 

Frkd Harrill - President 

Lkoxakd I I ccgixs -.- ----- - Vice-President 

Clarence Rudisill - - Treasurer 

Ma in' ]oK Smith 1 Secretary 












MEMBERS 



Samuel Burgin 
Wade Real 
Frank ChambERLA] \ 
George Costner 
Albert Garrison 
William Haynes 
Harold 1 1 on e vcutt 
Leonard I I uggins 
Fred Harrill 
Walden Hartman 
Monroe Kiser 
Huston Riser 
Vivian Lackey 
Forney La wing 
Dare AbernaTHEy 
Corine Bruner 
Robert Burgin 
Raci-i kl Cloninger 
Sue Betty Finger 
SisiE Gheen 
Emily Grigg 
Meita Hoke 
Mary Wallace Hoover 
Christine James 
Dora Moore 



F. izABETi-i McLean 
Leona Parker 
Martha Rogers 
Minnie B. Rocker 
M argarkt Sherrill 
Leonard Cark 
Walter Moore 
William Rhodes 
Yates Rudisill 
Jason Rudisill 
Hugh Rudisjll 
Clarence Rudisill 
Edison Shueord 
Fred Setzer 
Forest Smith 
Lemuel Williams 
McKelvix Womack 
Form-; KEEVER 
\j)\ ReEp 
Julius Keever 
Evelyn Shives 
Nellie Shueord 
Margaret Sigmon 
Marie Womack 



Page Forty-four 




























































When Authors Disagree What Can You 
Expect of Freshmen ? 

The following extracts arc from examination papers handed in during the 
fanuary finals, The question is quoted first, then the answer. \\ herever possi- 
ble the original spelling has been followed: 

Q. — "How long have you studied Algebra? Give name and authors of the 
hook you studied. Through what subject?" 

A. — "I have studied Algebra about four months. Algebra Crua is the hook 
we study." 

(This sounds like a cigar store. Leonardo Einorado and Ben Mura were 
the authors of the book of Algebra. ) 

"I have studied Algebra for nearly half a season." 

"Name Complete Algebra." 

"Singular Subject." 

O. — "Give a brief history of Algebra." 

A. — "Algebra was handed down from the Arabs to two or three men be- 
fore it reached the men of Hamidites then these men. Slaught and Lennes, pub- 
lished this book. 

"The hindus first had it and it was brought to Europe in the capture of 
Morocco and then it was brought to Spain by the commerce that was going on 
between them. 

"The Denouns were the first people have Algebra. But the Arabs were 
tlie first to introduce it into Europe. A German mathian was the first to use 
the si<;ns of caption. Before the printing press was invented there was a great 
attention paid to Algebra. 

"Algebra was created by Hindoos and then passed to the Arabs when the 
Arabs invaded Spain from Mexico they scattered it into Europe. 

"Algebra was brought from the Arabs over to Kgvpt and from them kept 
coming until it has gotten over to America." 

SOME INTERESTING EACTS OF HISTORY 

Marie Ahtionette — By her famous pants and her sallow face she would put 
Up to the kin<, r . 

Two revolutions that preceded the political revolution were the revolution 
of the earth around the sun, and the revolution of many other planets. 



Page Forty-five 


























High School "Judge" 

court news 

Miss Sara Hall. was arraigned in court last week on the charge of exceed- 
ing the speed limit of more than nine dates a week ; many former Romeos and 
Rudolphs offered numerous bonds. 

( >BSOLETE 

'Mn days gone by the young men came around at midnight to serenade 
young women." "The custom is impossible now," commented Miss Cayenne. 
"'A popular girl is very seldom at home at that hour." 

A young man was having a lot of trouble in getting on the right train to 
bring him home. After three or four unsuccessful attempts he finally got on 
the right one. Sitting down he began to swear comfortably. A minister seated 
behind him said. "Young man, stop your swearing. Don't you know you're on 
the way to Hell?" 

"Wrong train again," muttered the young man and hurriedly made his exit. 

SI 'ITT* )().\ BLUES 

( )n this 1 'hysics class 1 sit 
Golly, how I want to spit. 
But I must swallow if I can 
This tobaccer like a man. 
— By Bex Sum nEr. 

SWEET STUEE 

Arthur: What do you like best, Louise? 

LouiSE : Ice cream. 

Arthur: Scream your head off, I'll kiss you anyway. 

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 

RuSSELL: Can't see what there is in her that you are so smitten with. 

Philii': Why because she is so pretty. 

RUSSELL : Beauty's only skin deep. 

Philip : Well, sap, I'm no cannibal. That's deep enough for me. 

NOTICE ! 

Misses Addie 1 lauss and Blanche Yoder have been selected as delegates 
to the National Flapper Meet in Los Angeles. Miss John Anthony will accom- 
pany them as chaperone. 

QUITE Till-: BERRIES 

Rich Suitor: I would die for you. 
Jessica : How soon ? 

PAINT AD. 

The MODERN Girl's Motto: Save the surface and you save all. 



























PAGE FORTY-SIX 




































WHERE SILENCE WAS BEST 



Well-Meaning Stranger: Perhaps I can help you — there are one or 
two things I can tell you about your make of car. 

Motorist: Well, keep them to yourself, there are ladies present. 

Two colored men were standing on the corner discussing family trees. 

"Yes suh, man," said Ambrose. "1 can trace my relations back to a fam- 
ily tree." 

"Chase 'em back to a family tree," said Mose. 

"Naw man, trace 'em back, get me?" 

"Well, they ain't hut two kinds of things dat live in trees. Birds and mon- 
keys, and you sho' ain't got no feathers on you." 

PrytE : Miss Morris, what is the Latin race? 

Miss Morris: It is a race between the pupil's pony and the teacher's goat. 

WAILS FROM VAN 

I begged Helen to smile on me 

For I with love was daft 
She smiled, she more than smiled, for she 

She just held her sides and laughed. 

SINGLE TRACK MINDS 

Father oE the Sweet Young Thing: Did I see you kissing my daughter? 
Marvin : I really don't know, sir, I was too much occupied al the time to 
notice. 

THE LATEST STEP 

Fred: And what would you do if you were in my shoes? 

AddiE Mae: I'd point them toward the door and give them a start. 

FLAPPER LOGIC 

James: Why do girls prefer Virgil to all the other poets? 
Miss Anthony: Pecause he sings of arms and a man. 

SPEAKING OF IGNORANCE 

HELEN (studying the old poets): Miss Anthony, I've looked in every 
encyclopedia in the library, and I can't find a thing about this man. Anon. 

ALL MADE CLEAR 

Miss Anthony: Bob, what are the two genders? 

Bor : Masculine and feminine. The masculines are divided into temperate 
and intemperate and the feminine into frigid and torrid. 

NOT QUITE 

The Press Man (interviezving notorious personage recently released from 
prison) : And then shall 1 say that you walked forth from the grim gates of 
prison a free man? 



Page Forty-seven 





































A Mid-Winter Night's Dream 

CHARACTERS 

.Mr. Krauss Ignorance 

Iron head Class Heavenly Host 

Scene I 

I leaven in the twentieth century. Enter Angels, Ironhead class, Ignorance. 

Ignorance — "Hoi clog!" Spence do look! If there isn't Willie in the (luckiest little 
car yon ever saw. Do yell at her, she might give ns a lift. 

Spence — lli Bill!!! Since when that wheelbarrow? 

Willie (stopping car) — Hello! Wanta Ig-no-rance, what in heaven are you doing 

with that black dress on up here? Here! don't waste time standing there while 1 use up 
the gas. Its terrible expensive. Climb in. 

Ignorance — I'm sure I don't know why I ant the only one here in black, hut as soon 
as Saint Paul saw me he pulled out these hlack togs and this pair of hlack wings. But 
these wings aren't so had are they? They are decidedly the best pair here. 

Spence — Willie, I really do think yours are lovely. What wing tonic do you use? 

Willie — Why haven't you heard? Frank has put up a wing tonic shop right next to 
the "Hot Dog" stand. The tonic is scrumptious. 

Spence—] never did dream that heaven could he so heavenly as to have a hot-dog 
stand in it. 

Ignorance — I sure do like hack-hone, Spence. 

Spence — Oh! Excuse me. 

Willie — Aw, let's walk. I'm so darn tired riding I don't know what to do Anyway. 
Mr. Johnston promised to let me blow the horn this times. You see, Gabriel is taking a 
vacation and Mr. Johnston is doing his work. 

Ignorance — Glory! All the angels* are having a regular jubilee. Let Gabriel go hang 
himself and we'll lift our melodious voices so that this song will he a success. 

Spence — I've promised to meet Fred in the, drug store at four o'clock, hut I'll wait a 
minute. ' 

Ignorance — "Hail, Mail, the — — ." Greal guns! Spence! There comes Mr. Krauss. 
And he has his algebra hook under his arm. Look! Slaught and Lennes Complete Algebra. 

Spence— O-O-O-O-Oh ! 

Uinorancc — And he has a little ring around his head, hut he's st'll baldheaded. 

'Spence — Yes that ring is called a "halo." Only very good people get one. 

Ignorance — Well! I never thought I would see him in heaven of all places. Oh! he's 
coming this way. Ain't his wings per-fec-tly lovely? And they are tacked on with brass- 
headed tacks. Those wings make up for the lack of hair on his head. 

Spence — I'm kinder 'fraid he looks like lie docs when he is ready to cuss us out. I'm 
willing to he tin stir things up around here. Even heaven gets terribly dull sometimes, 
doesn't it? 

Ignorance — "UnHu." 

Mr. Krauss (taking Ignorance by the hand and dragging her away) — What is a square 
root? J No!!!! It positively is not two equal factors of a number, but one of two equal 
factors. 

Ignorance (under her breath) — Every day in every way I get smarter and smarter. 

Mr. Krauss — lied pardon? 

Ignorance — Nothing. 

Mr. Krauss — Yes, its sold at the drug store. 

Ignorance — Sub. 

Mr. Krauss — Yes ma'am ! 

Ignorance — A square root is . 

I/;-. Krauss — No! Now if you don't get it this time . 

Remainder of Ironhead ''lass (in stage whisper behind "dear teacher's" hack) — Ya ! 'la' 
Ya ! 1 told von : o. Te-he ! 

Ignorance — Prank sure does look like a devil. I thought 1 was in heaven, hut 1 guess 
I made a mistake. I didn't know that Algebra . 

,'\fr. Krauss — Beg pardon. 

Curtain. M . C. M. 



Page Forty-eight 



' 









/ /. Qlubs 











































Hi-Y Club 

[Iarold K. Krauss — Director 

Aktii ri< ] 'arkek President 

John Akers / 'ice-President 

Jam ks Sm ith Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Kenneth Goodson Kenneth Heavner Lawrence Warlick 

Rob GoodE Howell Gabriel Ben Sumner 

Aubrey ShivES Vaness Howard Russell Huggixs 

Rudolph ShivES Ralph Cochran George Crowell 

Kenneth DellingEr I). C. Leonard RhynE Little 

Austin AbErnathey Rai ( ph Parker James Smith 

Richard Rees James Putnam David Lore 

Arthur Parker Carl Marlow Loy ETeavnEr 

Marvin Royster Clyde AbErnathey 


















Page Fifty 

























Glee Club 

( )livia Chamberlain I 'res id cut 

James Smith / "ice -President 

Jessie Gamble — Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Mary Fulton Director 






! 



•I- * 












Aubrey Shives 
Arthur Par kick 
IIei.En Reinhardt 
Gladys Abernathey 
[da Ford 
Lai, a Withers 
Virginia ShErrill 
May Crouse Merritt 
Jessie Gamble 
Dimples Parker 
Viva Lee LinEbergEr 



MEMBERS 

[da High 
Rudolph Shives 
Howell Gabriel 
Clara Guignard 
Uessie Stamf.v 
Mae Williams 
k atm ekine i i \kkii.l 
Laura MacDonald 
OlliE Mae Crowell 
AddiE MaE S Eagle 
Rhvne Little 



Marn Si II KIM 






Carrie Hall.man 






Mary Yoder 






< >LIVIA CHAMBERL 


UN 




Virginia Lore 






James Smith 






Robert 1 >EllingEr 






Pauline Finger 






Myrtle Sell' 






Loy Heavner 






I'm I Li I' Coon 






Page Fifty. 


ONE 




































"Wigs and Masks" ( Dramatic Club ) 

Miss Eunice Mackoy ....Director 

Jessie Gamble President 

Rob Goode Vice-President 

Olivia Chamberlain Secretary and Treasurer 

-J, 4. 1$. 

MEMBERS 

Gladys Abernathey [Catherine Harrii.l Jack Ramsaur 

John AkERS FrEd Harrill Helen Rein hardy 

Blanche Blanton VanESS Howard Bryte Royster 

Olivia Chamberlain Carl Marlow John Senter 

Philip Coon Sarah Yoder Evelyn ShivEs 

OlljE Mae CrowEll Kenneth Goodson Rudolph Shives 

i\ '.rt 1 >ei, 1.1 m'.ek Viva LEE LinebErgEr Margaret Sigman 

Kenneth Delltnger Mary SpEncer Love Josephine Terrill 

I InwKu, Gabriel Elizabeth McLean Lawrence Warlick 

Clara Guignard May CrousE MerritT Zei.da Wingate 

Sarah ] 1 all Laura MacDonald Blanche Yoder 

Ralph Parker 





















Page Fifty -two 

















Advertising Club ( L-13 ) 

Miss AeETha Bailey Director 

OFFICERS 
Virginia Siierrile ----- - — /'resident 

George Crowele ----- - - - — Vice-President 

Nancy Robinson Secretary 

Virginia Lore ..— - - Treasurer 






BEULAH Bl, ANTON 

AlEne Broom 
Sam Burgin 
Fran k Chamberlain 
George Crow i".r.,r, 
Tn a Ford 
Frank Gamble 
Flay Garrison 



MKMUKRS 

Emily Grigg 
Pauline Honeycutt 
Harold Honeycutt 
Annie Huss 
Lit, i.ian KisER 
Margaret Lee 
Vjrginia Lore 
Dora ii Moore 



Walter Moore 
James Putnam 
Richard Rkes 
Nancy Robinson 
Clarence Rudisill 
Lai.a Withers 
Lemuel Williams 
Pansy Wood 






Page Fifty. three 
















"Do-Ras" 

Miss Mary Fulton .... Director 

Elizabeth HoylE President 

Winiered Perkins Vice-President 

Lucille LinEbERGER ..— Secretary and Treasurer 



Margaret Burgin 
Sibyl Costner 
Rachei, ColingER 
Sarah Dellinger 
Meita Hoke 
Virginia Hoke 
Bessie Hall 



MEMBERS 

Lena Johnston 
Mary Parker Lea 
Essie Lawing 
Lucille LinEbEkgEr 
Frances Mauney 
Bertha Owens 
Winifred Perkins 
Mary Frances Pagett 



Ruth Rudisill 
Janell Sudlow 
Eugenia Smith 
Dorothy Sullivan 
Pauline Sigman 
Inez SainE 
Betty West 






Page Fifty. four 










Art Class 



Miss Eva Lore - Director 



* * 



MKMMKRS 






Elizabeth Smith 
Sarah Yoder 
Geneae Hutcheson 
Louise Simmons 
Helen Reinhardt 
Mary Mines 
Miss Eulwood 
Virginia Hord 
Dorothy Putnam 






Page Fifty-five 










Radio Club 






W. M. GlKKn Director 

Forest Shuford President 

Lindsay Hunter Vice-President 

RiiynE Little ~ Secretary end Treasurer 



■b + + 



Al KM UK US 






Lindsay Hunter 

Sui^Ey Lawing 

Rhyne L,iTTije 

Charges Pegram 
James Pegram 



MElza Roseman 
Hugh Ruihsiij, 
Victor Rudtsiee 
Edison Shuford 
Forest Shuford 



Page Fifty. six 






















Basket Weavers 






Miss Eva Pore Director 












MEMBERS 

Ruth Davis 
Carrie Hallman 
Dorothy Putnam 
Ruth Parker 
Kate Robinson 
Louise White 



Page Fifty-seven 








































Busy Juniors 

First Term 

Scott Akers President 

Bennett Allen / 'ice-President 

William Riden hour Secretary 

Ethel Hark ill Treasurer 

Elizabeth Smith .. .. Critic 

Second Term 

James Little President 

Robert Camp Vice-President 

Eva Hoke - Secretary 

Ruffin Self Treasurer 

Lander Cobb Critic 

'V "ie "h 

MKMIiKRS 

Scott Akers SrsiE Thompson Wilma Ramsay John McCoy 

Bennett Allen J. I). Owens Curtis Broome Juanita Sain 

William RidENHOUr Ethel IIarrii.l Clyde CornwELL An xie LEE Edwards 

Rufein Sell' John Huss Troy Davis Robert Camp 

Ki,izabkth Smith Lander Cobb Guy Marrill Margaret Yoder 

.Mildred Grice Paul Crowell Oscar Broome Winnon Jonas 

Nellie Hoxeyott James Digh James Little Ruth Crews 

Austell Keener Harry Hartman Jack Costner Russell Long 

Eva Hoke Albert LSdFORd Paul Page IIei.En IIallman 

David Voder Sue Ella Shuford Noah Holbrook George McGee 

Louise HeavnEr Kate Mines Frank llri.i, Crowell Bay Askury 









Page Fifty-eight 






















Debating Club 

Miss Kate Currie .....Director 

Aubrey ShivEs - - - - — - - President 

Arthur Parker Vice-President 

Ralph Cochran Secretary and Treasurer 



aIKMI'.HRS 



Mildred Anderson 
Ralph Cochran 
Christine James 
Dimples Parker 
Arthur Parker 
A I aky Joe Sm it i i 
AchkEv Sin vies 
Marie Womack 
Fred Yoder 






Page Fifty-nine 













Si;win(; Club 

Miss Isabel Spears Director 

Myrtle Self President 

Addie Mae SeaglE - ~ Vice-President 

BryTE RoYSTER Secretary and Treasurer 

* * * 

MEMBERS 

Pauline Finger 
Addie Mar Hauss 
Ruth Rhodes 
Bryte Royster 
Addie MaE SeaglE 
Myrtle Self 
Bessie Stamey 
Louise Wet more 
Mae Williams 

Page Sixty 

















































L-Glub 

KknnKTU HeavnER I 'rcsid ml 

Kenneth Goodsox lice-President 

David Lore Secretary and Treasurer 

* * * 

MEMBERS 

Kenneth Goodson 
Robert Deelinger 
Neeson Smith 
Loy HeavneR 
George Croweee 
Marvin Royster 
I Iowki.e Gabriel 
Kenneth Heavner 
James Smith 
Arthur Parker 
David Lore 






Page Sixty-one 







"Skippers" Club 

Emily Hunter - - - President 

Margaret MERRITT Vice-President 

Eliza Putnam Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Elizabeth Foust - Advisor 



MEMBERS 



Billy BarinEau 

Sanders Guignard 

George Pace 

Mary Lou Smith 

Susie Gheen 

Eliza Putnam 

Mary Wallace Hoover 



Susan Long 
Xellje SharpE 
I > are Abernathey 
JR.uth Leonard 
Sue Betty Finger 
Emily Hunter 
Margaret Merritt 



Page Sixty-two 















///. \Athletics 



If 

By Rudyard Kipling 

If you can keep your head when all about you 

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, 
If yon can trust yourself when all men doubt yon, 

But make allowance for their doubting, too; 
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, 

( )r being lied about don't deal in lies, 
( >r being hated don't give way to hating, 

And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise; 

If you can dream — and not make dreams your master 

If yon can think — and not make thoughts your aim ; 
If yon can meet with Triumph and Disaster 

And treat those two imposters just the same ; 
If you can hear to hear the truth you've spoken 

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools. 
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, 

And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools; 

Jf you can make one heap of all your winnings 

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, 
And lose, and start again at your beginning 

And never breathe a word about your loss; 
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew 

To serve your turn along after they are gone, 
And so hold on when there is nothing in you 

Except the Will which says to them, "Hold on!" 

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue. 

( )r walk with kings — nor lose the common touch, 
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you. 

If all men count with you, but none too much; 
If you can fill the unforgiving minute 

With sixty seconds worth of distance run. 
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, 

And — which is more — you'll be a Man, my son! 

— From "Rezvards and Fairies." 












Page Sixty-four 

























Page Sixty-six 

































Football Summary 

MEMBERS 

Mr. George Dean - ----- - Coach 

Mr. II. K. ECrauss - - - faculty Manager 

VanESS I [oward - Captain 

Ken xktm 1 1 eavxer Manager 



I'amEs Smith Full Hack 

VanESS Howard Quarter Hack 

Ruber I )ELLi NGER .. Center 

"Bill" Haynes... ...Left Half Back 

Kenneth Goodson... .Right Half Back 

Kenneth Heavner Left End 

Arthur Parker Right Hnd 

Marvin Royster Left Tackle 

David Lore Right Tackle 

Howard Gabriel -Left Field 



George Croweli Right Field 

I). C. Leonard Line 

Ralph Cochran Line 

William Mali, man Line 

David Warlick Line 

Edison Shueord Line 

|oi i \ SENTER Line 

Russell Huggins Line 

J \mes 1 Vtnam Line 

Rich ard Rees Line 












RESULTS OF 

II. S. 36 

II. S 

II. S 47 

ir. s 6 

II. S 7 

EL S - - - 

II. S 12 

II. S. 

ir. s o 

EL S 

II. S 



I IK SEASON 

Dallas .... .. 

Huntersville 

Barium Springs 

Gastonia 7 

Forest City 12 

Spencer 20 

Mooresville 12 

Shelby .... 29 

Kings .Mountain 20 

Davidson 20 

Ml. Holly 12 






Page Sixty- seven 






Acknowledgments 












We have conic to the end <>t our story, but before 
the "conclusion is written we wish to extend our 
most sincere thanks, first of all to the School Board, 
composed of Dr. I. U. Self, Mr. M. II. Hoyle, Mr. 
Harry Page, Mr. II. Mauney, and Mr. J. R Love. 
These men have made it possible to print the third 
volume of the i 'i \K Burr. 

Much credit is due to our faculty advisor, Mr. II. \< . 
krauss. and to him we wish to extend our heart-felt 
gratitude. 

To Mr. I.. C. Boyer, of the Observer Printing 
Mouse. Inc., of Charlotte, N. C, we feel deeply in- 
debted for the great interest he took in the printing 
of this little book, and to him we extend our best 

wishes. 

The Staff". 






Page Sixty-eight 





































Page Sixty. nine 



1 



SAVE A DIME— SAVE A DOLLAR 



But Save At The 



First National Bank 



EINCOENTON, N. C. 




Resources of 
ONE and ONE-HALF MILLION DOLLARS 



D. E. RHYNE. President C. E. CHILDS, Vice-President 

E. O. ANDERSON'. Vice-President M. H. CLINE, Cashier 

M. H. KUHN, Asst. Cashier 



Z^V-r-d 



: AGFI Sf- VI N I V 






t 



Compliments of 



SIGMAN-REINHARDT COMPANY, Inc. 



Drainage Contractors 



LINCOLNTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



WISHING 

YOU 

MUCH 

SUCCESS 

DR. I. R. SELF 



T-***^> 



RIVER VIEW 
DAIRY 

1 v incolnton's Leading 
Dairy 

A H E R D O F S T A T E 

INSPEC T E D C O W S 

J. V. ASBURY 

Proprietor 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 






Page Seventy-one 



CAROLINA SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

Charlotte, N. C. 




KD 



SCHOOL DESKS AND AUDITORIUM CHAIRS 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS 



A* 



New High School Auditorium (Lincolnton) seated by us with 
American Opera Chairs 



A* 



This is one of the many High School Auditoriums in the 
Carolinas seated with this line of chairs 



Page Seventy. two 















the WINCHESTER store 



Baseball 


We are 


Sporting 


Football 


Pioneers 


Goods 


Basket-Bali 


in the 
Hardivare 


of 


nd Tennis Goods 


Business 


All Kinds 



\\ e carry only dependable lines that we can heartily recommend 

and we take care of your wants better today 

than ever before. 



The Store That Appreciates Your Trade 

H. E. Ramsaurs Sons 

GENERAL HARDWARE 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r-#^^#0 



Page Seventy-three 

































A n Educated Clientele 

Appreciates Efficient Service 



We endeavor to satisfy our customers by 
square dealing and prompt, efficient service 
at all times. 

We handle Texaco Gasoline and Oils and 
Automobiles and Accessories of all kinds. 



HUPMOBILE SERVICE STATION 

Air, Water and Courteous Treatment 
are Always Free. 

MAIN STREET FILLING STATION 
LlNCOLNTON, N. G. 



Page Seventy. four 












DIXIE GROCERY CO. I 

Inc. 



EXCLUSIVELY WHOLESALE 



DIAMOND TIRES, CORDS 
AND FABRICS 



PHONES 112 and 420 

Lincolnton, North Carolina 






r***J 









Page Seventy-five 









Shop At The 

LINCOLNTON VARIETY 
STORE 




5c, 10c AND UP 

Next to the Post Office 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



DR. L. M. COFFEY 

DENTIST 
First National Bank Building 



1 



r-^^^* 



J. L. HUNTER 

Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy 
GROCERIES 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



LEONARD BROTHERS 



DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS 
Ladies' and Men's Furnishings 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



PUTNAM'S BARBER SHOP 

The Leading Shop, With Six 
Chairs Located on Main Street 

We Appreciate Your Business 

TUB AND SHOWER BATHS 

Children Hair Cutting a Specialty 

M. A. PUTNAM, Prop. 



C. GUY RUDISILL & BRO. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, SHOES 
CLOTHING AND HATS 

"From the Cheapest That's Good 
To the Best That's Made." 

Page Seventy-six 



r-#^#--#^*s#s^4~ 



BUICK AUTOMOBILES 

"The Car That You will Be 

Satisfied With" 

THE STANDARD OF 

COMPARISON 

Our Garage is Equipped With 

Modern Machinery 

JOHN K. KLINE & SON 



Phone 341 



t^*^^-^#.#^j 



Lincolnton, N. C. 



f**######*####**#^- 



YODER & McLEAN 

Dealer In 

High Grade Furniture 

Funeral Directors 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



















































CHILDS & GHILDS 

ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r,\ 



* + *>++ +++++ + -*'^-+-*+-&-++ + + + -++-+ + + ++ ++4-' 



A Sincere Respect 



for the laws of the land 

is essential to good 

citizenship and 

success in life. 



GHAS. A. JONAS 



,*-#--*.#s* -*.#■.#.* 



r~* 



C< )M PIGMENTS OF 
W. M. NlCHOESON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 



Lincolnton, N. G. 



Lincolnton Bonded 
Warehouse Go. 

COTTON STORAGE 

PHONE NUMBER 215 

RATES REASONABLE 



Consign Your Cotton Here 
for Storage and ( )uick Sale 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



, >*■* ***■*+# + * 4 






r-r^r-^*^ 



Page Seventy. seven 
























LINCOLNTON DRUG COMPANY 

J. A. Suttle C. B. Phillips 

THE REXALL STORE 

Phone 17 
Everything in Drugs, Stationery, Drug Sundries and Eastman Kodaks 

Agents For 

SCHOLTZ, THE FLORIST 

NUNALLY'S AND HOLLINGSWORTH'S 
UNUSUAL CANDIES 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r-r^J 









MEETING PLACE 

Childs-Wolfe Drug Company 

Field and Garden Seeds, Drugs, Toilet Articles, School Supplies, 
Stationery, Cameras, Films Developed. 

SODAS, CIGARS 

Electrical Fixtures and Lamps, Cut Flowers for all Occasions 

COME, CALL OR WRITE us your wants. We appreciate the business, so 
kindly give us the first chance at your needs 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



C~ ######*###**##****#**#***#**###**#**###*j 



Page Seventy. eight 









r~ 


















1 f IGH GRADE AUTOMOBILES 




DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 
STUDEBAKER LIGHT AND SPECIAL SIXES 

ENOUGH SAID 



Gall On Us For Demonstration 



Hoyle Implement Company jj 



Phone 102 






Page Seventy-nine 









Outdoor Sporting Goods 




THERE IS NO TONIC THAT EQUALS 
THE GREAT OUT-OF-DOORS 



Whether you like moderate exercise like croquet or the more 

strenuous tennis or baseball, you will find here every essential for 

personal or field equipment. 




Page Eighty 
























ABSOLUTELY > 

NECESSARY 

j to your happy existence is a re- 
liable Ice and Coal Dealer. 

THAT'S US 

That's Part of an Education Too 
Phone 50 

Johnston Ice & 

| Fuel Company 



Kenneth Grigg & 
Company 



COTTON 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r +*•*■+ +^+*-^<0^0-^-*^-0-^-^-*- J 



^^■^•*^tfsjs#s.- 



r*s#s#s#-.# 



LINCOLN STORE 

FANCY GROCERIES 
Phone 229 

Best Quality 
Careful Service 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 





We carry in stock at all times a 
full line of fresh and cured meats. 



Our Motto Is: 

'A SQUARE DEAL TO 
EVERYBODY." 



Phone 389 
Yours to Please 

WILLIAMS & MoKIXXIS 



"ON THE SQUARE" 

THE ROBINSON AND COMPANY 

Headquarters for everything in ready-to-wear for the ladies. Clothing and 
gents' furnishings for the men; shoes and Oxfords for the whole family. 

ROBINSON & COMPANY 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



~J 






Page Eighty-one 









THE SHOE STORE 

W. L. DOUGLASS SHOES 

IF IT'S NEW OR IF IT'S GOOD 
YOU CAN GET IT AT 

"T he Square Store" 




LAWING & COSTNER 

Druggists 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

WATERMAN AND PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

REDI-POINT PENCILS 

WHITMAN'S AND BLOCK'S CANDIES 



Page Eighty-two 









r**+4 



A. & P. STORE 



f###############vr#########^--i 



Mauney & Nixon 



Fancy and Staple Groceries 



Chevrolet Dealers 



L 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r-*^#--#^#^#sr.#- #-.#--#■.« - 



McLean Marble 
Works 

South Academy St. 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 

Marble Limestone 

Granite Sand Stone 



r-#s#^J 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Lincolnton Milling 
Company 

Dealers In 

HIGH GRADE FLOUR 

Phone 32 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Robinson Grocery 
Company 

Groceries of all Kinds 
"CASH AND CARRY" 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r^*-* 



Bolick Paint Shop 

The Highest Grade of Painting 
Done Anywhere 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 






City Meat Market 

A Complete Line of the 
BEST MEATS 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Chauncey D. Stroup 

Public Accountant 

AUDITS— SYSTEMS— TAX 
SERVICE 

Member 

National Association of Cost 

Accountants 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



.►///#//j 






page eighty-three 












Lithia Bottling Works 

SOFT DRINKS OF ALL 
KINDS 



Nothing better than a cool 
drink in the summer time. 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Warlick Furniture 
Company 

THE HOME OF GOOD 
FURNITURE 



Phone 166 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 






1 



Marble 
Granite 



Limestone 
Sandstone 



Estimates Cheerfully Given 

JOHN J. MORTON 

CUT STONE CONTRACTOR 

West Morehead and P. & N. 
Railroad 

West Fifth and Railroad 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Stonework in all 

Its Branches P. O. BOX 291 






Standard Oil Go. 



1 



LUBRICATING OILS OF > 
ALL KINDS 



ONCE YOU USE IT YOU WILL 
CONTINUE TO DO SO 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 






























Page. Eighty. four 


















r~* 



r~" 



N. Y. G. LUNCH 

A Sanitary Place to Eat 
"HOT DOGS" 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



r-r r-r-r 4 +■*•■*■* +a - 



Carolina Oil Co. 

Lincolnton, N. C. 



army & navy 
storp: 

Men's Iuirnishings of all 
Kinds 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



* + <?* + + + *<r+ + **- + +r+j+#**+4- + *r» + 4 



Champion Music 



Store 



We carry in stock Lubricating Oils 
of every kind. Grease. Transmis- 
sion Lubricants, Texaco Auto Gas, 
Christolite Oil. Try it and you 
will continue to use it. 



PIANOS 



VICTROLAS \ 



The Latest Sheet Music and 
Records 



Branches : 
Lenoir, Morgcinton and 

Newton, N. C. 



'or anything m music cal 
on us 




THE ABERNETH Y CO. 

"COTTON" 



Lincolnton, N. C. 















Page Eighty. five 
















**■**■*■ *-^ + + *■#-* *■*■*■*, - 



A. W. Webber J. L. Taylor 

Lincolnton Plumbing and Heating Co. 

ARCOLA HEATING A SPECIALTY 
Export Plumbing and Heating 

Contractors 

Steam, Hot Water and Vapor 

Heating 

Phone No. 31 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 




Byars Motor Co. 

lincolnton, n. c. 

Phone 61 



.v#sr-#-^-/'-^.#' 






Hinson's Garage 



Agents for 
HUDSON and ESSEX 



WEST MAIN ST. 



LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



» r &*■*■*■* fi-+^+.+*^*--*+-*--+ 



**■-} 



Drink Bottled 
COCA-COLA 

Good Grape, Orange Crush, 
Cherry Blossom 

Lincolnton Coca-Cola 
Company 



* *++ + £ ■<*■ + •+ +■■+■&■ ■+**-# *■ + + + -4 



*■ + * + J 



*-■+■+■*+■+■+* *4> 



Lineberger Bros. 

"COTTON" 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



- »S#^<#s#\#s#-.# 



^#--#'-#-^##'#-^-#-#s#S#S#s#S-' 



SAIN MOTOR CO. 

Agents For 
STARS AND DURANTS 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



?■#-/ ^ +■**■ + + + ++* + + ■* + + + * + *■** 



The 
Young Men's Store 

CLEANERS, TAILORS 

AND FURNISH KRS 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 









Page Eighty. six 































Page Eighty. seven 


















NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING 

E. C. BROOKS, LL.D., President 

THE STATE'S TECHNICAL COLLEGE, COMPRISING 

THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

THE SCHOOL OF GENERAL SCIENCE 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Entrance requirements for Freshman Class, Graduation from Standard High 

School or 15 Units 

For catalog, illustrated circulars, and entrance blanks, write 
E. B. OWEN, Registrar, State College Station, Raleigh, N. C. 



r *--*■+-*-+ *-+ + + 



*#s#>^ 









BELK, JOHNSTON CO. 

The Home of Better Values 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 

SHOWING THE NEWEST THINGS IN 

Ready-To-Wear Shoes, Clothing, Silks, Hosiery, Millinery 

Furnishings, Laces and Notions at All Times 

We Sell Quality Merchandise for Less. 

We Are Always Pleased to Show You 



BELK, JOHNSTON CO. 






Pagf Eighty-fight 



r*S#N*N*S#N#S#S#S#S#N#S 



■+*-^i> 






























Real Service 



Every business has its ideals and 
ambitions; its personnel, products 
and methods of sale • Printing 
is the art oi bringing these ele- 
ments together in one compact, 
representative, harmonious whole. 
Your printing should express the 
advantage there is in specialized 
skill, lor good printing, like a 
good man, will live long to the 
ends ol usefulness and service. 



The Observer Printing House 



INCORPORATED 



''Printen and "r>/an{ "TSoo^ 
\JtCanufatturers 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



1 






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